LOW VISION WORKS CONSULTING GROUP

The Low Vision Works Solution

Low Vision Works Consulting Group (LVWCG) is a turnkey, fully managed low vision rehabilitative services consulting company with proven results and experience. Our goal is to implement and manage a successful low vision rehabilitation program for your practice.

The LVWCG affiliate relationship generates revenue for the affiliate and guides them in gaining market share within their community. LVWCG also provides generous marketing support to its affiliates through national marketing efforts, existing federal systems network contacts and established nationwide relationships within the medical community. LVWCG also has access to a nationwide network of certified therapists that are readily recruited to immediately impact to your revenue stream.

Low Vision Rehabilitation

Specific training in low vision rehabilitation theory and method is needed before occupational therapists can provide comprehensive and competent services.

By 2030, the Administration on Aging projects the number of older adults in the U.S. will more than double to nearly 70 million, with persons over 85 years projected to be the fastest growing segment of this population. It is estimated that nearly 25% of these adults will experience vision loss severe enough to impair their ability to complete daily activities.

The significant growth rate of the elderly population in the United States has increased the need for health care professionals to provide low vision rehabilitation. Occupational therapy services, in particular, are in demand because of the profession’s expertise in addressing issues related to aging and disability.

Reimbursement for services does not guarantee competency. Specific training in low vision rehabilitation theory and method is needed before occupational therapists can provide comprehensive and competent services. Other professions providing low vision rehabilitation services are openly questioning the competency of occupational therapists to provide services.

While specialized training or certification is not required for occupational therapists to provide low vision rehabilitation services, as professionals, occupational therapy practitioners must be able to demonstrate basic mastery of low vision rehabilitation precepts before providing services.

Clinical Staff

Your therapists go through an intensive standardized CE eligible program and become a Low Vision Works certified practitioner.

ONGOING TRAINING & COMMUNICATION IS KEY

Your therapists go through an intensive standardized CE eligible program and become a Low Vision Works certified practitioner.

Therapists are given the appropriate treatment tools, optical equipment, documentation templates and training in order to be successful with the patients you serve.

We maintain the quality of care delivered by the clinicians by administering written exams three times a year, clinical checkouts, and documentation auditing. Their results are scored and clinicians are mentored as areas of opportunity arise.

Training consists of over 160 hours. We ensure the highest possible standard of care in the Low Vision Program with no options of compromise.

Your clinicians have access to our low vision professionals to answer any questions they may have about a specific case or just to pose a question about treatment to our staff.

Monthly meetings and training sessions are arranged to keep practitioners abreast of industry changes and provide additional training to continually add to their repertoire of clinical skills.

Vandendooren Protocol

Eighty individuals were randomly selected from a group of 2,500 patients who suffered from significant visual impairment and participated in the Vandendooren Protocol (VP) home occupational therapy low vision rehabilitation program.

PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF THE OUTCOMES OF THE VANDENDOOREN PROTOCOL

Abstract:
Eighty individuals were randomly selected from a group of 2,500 patients who suffered from significant visual impairment and participated in the Vandendooren Protocol (VP) home occupational therapy low vision rehabilitation program.

These patients were retrospectively analyzed using functional acuity outcome measures. The results showed 47.76% increase in functional visual acuity. Further analysis and expansion of the group size is planned.

Purpose:
The purpose of this retrospective study was to describe functional acuity outcome measures after subjects participated in a home occupational therapy low vision rehabilitation program.

Methods:
We analyzed the OU (both eyes) functional visual acuity measurements of a random sampling of 80 individuals who participated in the VP home health occupational therapy low vision rehabilitation program at initial evaluation and at discharge. Participants were included if they had a visual disturbance such that it affected their ability to perform meaningful daily activities. Functional acuity was measured using the Colenbrander Visual Acuity Chart at a distance of 100 cm in the individual’s home under identical lighting conditions. We used a paired T-test to determine if there were any differences in functional visual acuity.

PATIENT OUTCOMES OF FUNCTIONAL VISUAL ACUITY

Results:
Results indicate a significant (P=.0015, r=0.24, CI=95%) difference in functional visual acuity at initial evaluation (mean OU acuity 20/283, SD 249) and at discharge (mean OU acuity 20/179, SD 140), representing an average improvement of approximately two Snellen lines.

Conclusions:

Results indicated that participants in the VP occupational therapy low vision rehabilitation program had significant improvement in functional visual acuity measures after participation.

80 Patients experienced an average of 47% increase in functional visual acuity.
On average patients improved two Snellen lines on the Colenbrander Intermediate Acuity Chart.
See the Results
Robert E. Kalina, MD, a member of the vision rehabilitation committee,noted that when conventional medical techniques fail, “we don’t go to the next step, which is to help patients make the most of their remaining vision.” He noted that the situation is not one-sided. “The patients are guilty of looking for a cure instead of looking for a way to maximize their existing vision. It’s your job to help them find the way,” said Dr. Kalina, professor of ophthalmology at the University of Washington, Seattle.
I started Low Vision Works in September. Half way through the program, my O.T. (Occupational Therapist) re-evaluated my vision. In my good eye, it had improved from 20/200 to 20/70. A week later, I saw my ophthalmologist for my yearly exam. He was amazed that my vision had improved so much since I saw him a year ago.

I can’t brag enough on the professionals who have been working with me. And I am especially proud of the lady who designed this program. I want to encourage anyone who has AMD (Age-related Macular Degeneration) to contact Low Vision Works and get with the program. It really works!”
Elsie BrearleyNovember 1, 2011